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Parker Wood
Parker Wood

How Arturia Rev PLATE-140 Can Transform Your Music Production with Vintage Reverb


Introduction




Reverb is one of the most essential effects in music production. It can add depth, space, dimension, and realism to your tracks. It can also enhance the mood, atmosphere, and emotion of your music.




Arturia Rev PLATE-140 Vintage Reverb V1.0.0.1874 X64 VST AU AAX WiN MAC [FREE FOR LiMiTED TiME]


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But not all reverbs are created equal. Some reverbs sound natural and organic, while others sound artificial and metallic. Some reverbs are versatile and flexible, while others are limited and rigid. Some reverbs are easy and intuitive to use, while others are complex and confusing.


That's why you need a reverb plugin that can deliver the best of both worlds: a reverb plugin that can recreate the classic sound of a plate reverb, but also have the flexibility and convenience of a digital plugin.


That's exactly what Arturia Rev PLATE-140 is: a virtual recreation of the famed classic EMT 140 plate reverb and its vacuum tube preamp. A classic, full-bodied studio plate reverb with a lush tail, a dream come true for vocals, and adding that sought-after glue and space to your mix.


But that's not all: Arturia has also added some modern features and enhancements to make this plugin even more powerful and versatile. You can adjust the pre-delay, the high-pass filter, the chorus, and the post-reverb EQ to shape the sound to your liking. You can also choose from three different plate models, each with its own character and tone.


And the best part is: you can get Arturia Rev PLATE-140 for free for a limited time! Yes, you read that right: this amazing plugin is currently available as a free download from Arturia's website until December 25th, 2023. All you need to do is sign up for an Arturia account and register the plugin before the offer expires.


So what are you waiting for? Don't miss this opportunity to add this legendary reverb to your arsenal. In this article, we'll show you everything you need to know about Arturia Rev PLATE-140: its history, its features, its benefits, and how to use it in your music production. Let's dive in!


History of plate reverb




Before we get into the details of Arturia Rev PLATE-140, let's take a look at the history of plate reverb and why it's so special. Plate reverb is one of the oldest types of artificial reverb, dating back to the late 1950s. It was invented by German company Elektromesstechnik (EMT), which specialized in audio equipment for broadcasting and recording studios.


What is plate reverb and how does it work




Plate reverb is a mechanical device that simulates the sound of reverberation in a large room. It consists of a large metal sheet (usually around 2 x 3 meters) suspended inside a wooden frame. A transducer (similar to a speaker) is attached to the center of the sheet, which vibrates it according to the input signal. The vibrations travel across the sheet and bounce back from the edges, creating multiple echoes that blend together into a smooth decay. The sound of the vibrating sheet is picked up by two or more contact microphones (similar to guitar pickups) mounted on the frame, which send it back to the output.


The plate reverb unit also has a vacuum tube preamp that amplifies the input signal and adds some warmth and color to the sound. The preamp also has a gain control that can be used to adjust the level of reverberation. The higher the gain, the more intense and dense the reverb becomes.


How plate reverb was invented and used in the past




The first plate reverb unit was designed by Wilhelm Franz at EMT in 1957. It was called the EMT 140 and it was a breakthrough technology at the time. Before plate reverb, studios had to use natural reverberation chambers (large rooms with reflective surfaces) or spring reverbs (coils of metal wire that vibrate when an electric current passes through them) to create artificial reverb effects. Both methods had their limitations: natural chambers were expensive, space-consuming, and hard to control; spring reverbs were cheap, compact, and easy to use, but they sounded metallic, boingy, and unrealistic.


The EMT 140 solved these problems by offering a new way of creating artificial reverb that was more realistic, versatile, and convenient than ever before. The EMT 140 was able to produce a smooth and natural-sounding decay that could be adjusted from 0.4 to 5 seconds by changing the damping pads on the metal sheet. The EMT 140 also had a remote control unit that allowed users to switch between three different reverberation modes: A (mono), B (stereo), and C (reduced high frequencies).


The EMT 140 quickly became a studio essential and was used on countless records by legendary artists such as The Beatles, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, ABBA, Queen, U2, and many more. It was especially popular for vocals, as it added depth, dimension, and richness to the human voice. Some famous examples of songs that feature plate reverb are "Hey Jude" by The Beatles, "Time" by Pink Floyd, "Stairway to Heaven" by Led Zeppelin, " "Dancing Queen" by ABBA, and "Bohemian Rhapsody" by Queen.


How plate reverb differs from other types of reverb




Plate reverb has a distinctive sound that sets it apart from other types of reverb. Compared to natural reverb, plate reverb has a more uniform and diffuse decay, as it lacks the early reflections and room modes that create a sense of space and direction. Compared to spring reverb, plate reverb has a smoother and warmer decay, as it avoids the metallic and resonant artifacts that spring reverb produces. Compared to digital reverb, plate reverb has a more analog and organic decay, as it preserves the harmonic content and dynamics of the input signal.


Plate reverb is also known for its ability to add glue and cohesion to a mix, as it creates a subtle layer of ambience that blends the different elements together. Plate reverb can also enhance the presence and clarity of a sound, as it adds some brightness and sparkle to the high frequencies. Plate reverb can also create a sense of depth and distance, as it pushes the sound back in the stereo field.


Plate reverb is suitable for a wide range of instruments and genres, but it is especially effective for vocals, acoustic guitars, pianos, strings, brass, and drums. Plate reverb can add warmth, body, and character to these instruments, making them sound more lively and expressive.


How to use Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your music production




Now that you have learned about the history and the sound of plate reverb, let's see how you can use Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your music production. Arturia Rev PLATE-140 is a faithful emulation of the original EMT 140 plate reverb and its vacuum tube preamp, but with some modern enhancements and features that make it even more versatile and user-friendly. Here are the steps you need to follow to install, activate, access, use, and apply Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your music production.


How to install and activate Arturia Rev PLATE-140 on your computer




The first thing you need to do is to download Arturia Rev PLATE-140 from Arturia's website. Remember, this plugin is free for a limited time until December 25th, 2023, so don't miss this chance to get it. To download Arturia Rev PLATE-140, you need to sign up for an Arturia account or log in if you already have one. Then, you need to register the plugin by entering your email address and agreeing to the terms and conditions.


Once you have downloaded Arturia Rev PLATE-140, you need to install it on your computer. The installation process is simple and straightforward: just run the installer file and follow the instructions on the screen. You can choose the destination folder for the plugin files and select the formats you want to install (VST, AU, or AAX). You can also choose whether you want to install the standalone version of Arturia Rev PLATE-140 or not.


After you have installed Arturia Rev PLATE-140 on your computer, you need to activate it using the Arturia Software Center (ASC). The ASC is a tool that manages all your Arturia products and licenses. You can launch the ASC from your desktop or from your start menu. To activate Arturia Rev PLATE-140, you need to log in with your Arturia account credentials and click on the "Activate" button next to the plugin name. You will see a confirmation message that says "Activation successful".


How to access and use Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your DAW




The next thing you need to do is to access and use Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your digital audio workstation (DAW). The process may vary depending on your DAW of choice, but the general idea is the same: you need to load Arturia Rev PLATE-140 as an insert effect on an audio track or a bus. For example, if you are using Ableton Live, you can drag and drop Arturia Rev PLATE-140 from the browser into an empty audio effect slot on an audio track or a return track.


Once you have loaded Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your DAW, you will see its user interface (UI) on your screen. The UI consists of four main sections: the input section, the plate section, the output section, and the preset section. Let's take a look at each section in detail. The input section




The input section is where you can adjust the input level and the pre-delay of the signal that goes into the plate reverb. The input level is controlled by a large knob that can be turned left or right to decrease or increase the gain. The pre-delay is controlled by a smaller knob that can be turned left or right to shorten or lengthen the time between the dry signal and the wet signal. The input section also has a high-pass filter switch that can be toggled on or off to cut off the low frequencies below 80 Hz from the input signal. This can help reduce muddiness and rumble in the reverb.


The plate section




The plate section is where you can select and modify the plate model and the decay time of the reverb. The plate model is selected by a three-way switch that lets you choose between three different plates: A, B, and C. Each plate has its own sonic characteristics and response, as follows:


  • Plate A: This is the default plate model, which is based on the original EMT 140 plate reverb. It has a smooth and balanced sound, with a slight emphasis on the mid-range frequencies. It works well for most instruments and genres.



  • Plate B: This is a brighter plate model, which is based on a modified EMT 140 plate reverb. It has a more crisp and airy sound, with a boost on the high frequencies. It works well for vocals, acoustic guitars, pianos, and other instruments that need some sparkle and presence.



  • Plate C: This is a darker plate model, which is based on a custom-made plate reverb. It has a more warm and mellow sound, with a cut on the high frequencies. It works well for drums, bass, synths, and other instruments that need some depth and weight.



The decay time is controlled by a large knob that can be turned left or right to shorten or lengthen the duration of the reverb tail. The decay time can range from 0.4 seconds to 5 seconds, depending on the plate model and the damping pads. The damping pads are small pieces of felt that are attached to the metal sheet to control its vibration and resonance. The damping pads can be adjusted by two sliders that let you change the amount of damping on the low frequencies and the high frequencies separately. The more damping you apply, the shorter and smoother the decay becomes.


The output section




The output section is where you can adjust the output level and the post-reverb EQ of the signal that comes out of the plate reverb. The output level is controlled by a large knob that can be turned left or right to decrease or increase the gain. The post-reverb EQ is controlled by two smaller knobs that let you boost or cut the low frequencies (below 600 Hz) and the high frequencies (above 10 kHz) separately. The output section also has a chorus switch that can be toggled on or off to add some modulation and movement to the reverb tail. This can help create a more lush and spacious sound.


The preset section




The preset section is where you can access and manage the presets of Arturia Rev PLATE-140. A preset is a combination of settings that can be saved and recalled for later use. Arturia Rev PLATE-140 comes with over 50 presets that are organized into categories such as vocals, drums, guitars, keyboards, strings, etc. You can browse through the presets by using the arrows or clicking on the preset name. You can also save your own presets by clicking on the save button and entering a name for your preset. You can also delete or rename your presets by clicking on the edit button. How to apply plate reverb to different instruments and genres




Now that you know how to use Arturia Rev PLATE-140 in your DAW, let's see how you can apply plate reverb to different instruments and genres. Plate reverb is a versatile and flexible effect that can enhance any kind of sound, but it also requires some careful tweaking and experimentation to find the right balance and blend. Here are some general tips and guidelines for applying plate reverb to different instruments and genres:


Vocals




Vocals are one of the most common and popular applications of plate reverb, as it can add warmth, body, and dimension to the human voice. Plate reverb can also help vocals stand out in the mix, as it adds some brightness and presence to the high frequencies. However, plate reverb can also make vocals sound muddy, distant, or washed out if used excessively or improperly. Here are some tips for applying plate reverb to vocals:


  • Use a moderate amount of pre-delay (around 50-100 ms) to create some separation between the dry and wet signals. This will help preserve the clarity and intelligibility of the vocals.



  • Use a moderate amount of decay time (around 1-2 seconds) to create a smooth and natural-sounding tail. Avoid using too long or too short decay times, as they can sound unnatural or abrupt.



  • Use a low-cut or high-pass filter on the input signal to remove any unwanted low frequencies (below 80 Hz) from the vocals. This will help reduce muddiness and rumble in the reverb.



  • Use a high-cut or low-pass filter on the output signal to remove any unwanted high frequencies (above 10 kHz) from the reverb. This will help reduce harshness and sibilance in the reverb.



  • Use a subtle amount of chorus on the output signal to add some modulation and movement to the reverb tail. This will help create a more lush and spacious sound.



  • Use a bright plate model (such as Plate B) for vocals that need some sparkle and presence, or a dark plate model (such as Plate C) for vocals that need some depth and weight.



  • Use a send/return configuration to apply plate reverb to vocals, rather than an insert configuration. This will allow you to control the amount of reverb on each vocal track separately, and also blend the reverb with other effects (such as compression, EQ, delay, etc.) on the return track.



Acoustic guitars




Acoustic guitars are another common and popular application of plate reverb, as it can add depth, space, and realism to the acoustic sound. Plate reverb can also enhance the richness, warmth, and resonance of acoustic guitars. However, plate reverb can also make acoustic guitars sound boomy, boxy, or blurry if used excessively or improperly. Here are some tips for applying plate reverb to acoustic guitars:


  • Use a short amount of pre-delay (around 10-50 ms) to create some separation between the dry and wet signals. This will help preserve the attack and definition of the acoustic guitar.



  • Use a short amount of decay time (around 0.5-1 second) to create a tight and natural-sounding tail. Avoid using too long or too short decay times, as they can sound unnatural or abrupt.



  • Use a low-cut or high-pass filter on the input signal to remove any unwanted low frequencies (below 80 Hz) from the acoustic guitar. This will help reduce boomy-ness and feedback in the reverb.



  • Use a high-cut or low-pass filter on the output signal to remove any unwanted high frequencies (above 10 kHz) from the reverb. This will help reduce harshness and brittleness in the reverb.



  • Use a subtle amount of chorus on the output signal to add some modulation and movement to the reverb tail. This will help create a more lush and spacious sound.



  • Use a balanced plate model (such as Plate A) for acoustic guitars that need some smoothness and balance, or a bright plate model (such as Plate B) for acoustic guitars that need some crispness and clarity.



  • Use a send/return configuration to apply plate reverb to acoustic guitars, rather than an insert configuration. This will allow you to control the amount of reverb on each acoustic guitar track separately, and also blend the reverb with other effects (such as compression, EQ, delay, etc.) on the return track.



Pianos




Pianos are another common and popular application of plate reverb, as it can add depth, space, and realism to the piano sound. Plate reverb can also enhance the richness, warmth, and resonance of pianos. However, plate reverb can also make pianos sound muddy, distant, or washed out if used excessively or improperly. Here are some tips for applying plate reverb to pianos:


  • Use a moderate amount of pre-delay (around 50-100 ms) to create some separation between the dry and wet signals. This will help preserve the clarity and intelligibility of the piano.



  • Use a moderate amount of decay time (around 1-2 seconds) to create a smooth and natural-sounding tail. Avoid using too long or too short decay times, as they can sound unnatural or abrupt.



  • Use a low-cut or high-pass filter on the input signal to remove any unwanted low frequencies (below 80 Hz) from the piano. This will help reduce muddiness and rumble in the reverb.



  • Use a high-cut or low-pass filter on the output signal to remove any unwanted high frequencies (above 10 kHz) from the reverb. This will help reduce harshness and sibilance in the reverb.



  • Use a subtle amount of chorus on the output signal to add some modulation and movement to the reverb tail. This will help create a more lush and spacious sound.



  • Use a balanced plate model (such as Plate A) for pianos that need some smoothness and balance, or a bright plate model (such as Plate B) for pianos that need some crispness and clarity.



  • Use a send/return configuration to apply plate reverb to pianos, rather than an insert configuration. This will allow you to control the amount of reverb on each piano track separately, and also blend the reverb with other effects (such as compression, EQ, delay, etc.) on the return track.



Strings




Strings are another common and popular application of plate reverb, as it can add depth, space, and realism to the string sound. Plate reverb can also enhance the richness, warmth, and resonance of strings. However, plate reverb can also make strings sound muddy, distant, or washed out if used excessively or improperly. Here are some tips for applying plate reverb to strings:


  • Use a long amount of pre-delay (around 100-200 ms) to create some separation between the dry and wet signals. This will help preserve the attack and definition of the strings.



  • Use a long amount of decay time (around 2-4 seconds) to create a smooth and natural-sounding tail. Avoid using too long or too short decay times, as they can sound unnatural or abrupt.



Use a low-cut or high-pass filter on the input signal to remove any unwanted low frequencies (below 80 Hz) from the strings. This will help reduce muddin


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